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Ever since it came to light that around half of Samsung Galaxy S4’s internal storage is occupied with bloatware, many angered Samsung fans voiced their frustrations around the cyberspace and it seems like this heated discussion has caught the Korean Conglomerate’s attention.

Today, Samsung has sent out a response to all those who have expressed concerns over this particular issue. In a statement to CNet, Samsung says that if you’re a Galaxy S4 user and you find the handset’s storage situation to be problematic, you really shouldn’t because they made things the way they are to provide users with bundle of features and a high resolution display.

Whereas storage issues are concerned, Samsung dodged the bullet by saying that the users can take advantage of microSD slot bundled with every S4 device. With the absence of external storage solutions in flagship devices like HTC One and iPhone 5, the inclusion of microSD slot in Samsung devices is definitely a deal breaker for many. But the main concern is the fact that apps can’t be installed on external storage that renders such kind of addition somewhat useless.

However users are generally angered over the fact that Samsung advertised Galaxy S4 as 16GB models even though users can only really use a little over 8GB of space in them. This has left several users saying that Samsung should advertise the cheapest version of Galaxy S4 as having 8GB or make the device cheaper. But it’s obvious that Samsung would loathe doing anyone of that.

At the moment, users who’re having concerns over less internal storage can always opt for a smartphone with higher internal storage capability, albeit it’s a costly endeavour. On the other hand, Samsung could either ship 32GB variants at the price of 16GB version, or introduce high-speed microSD cards in the near future capable of running apps/games so that internal storage no longer remains in the picture. Are you facing internal storage problems on your Galaxy S4? What suggestion do you have for Samsung regarding this matter?

(via CNet)

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